Friday, February 13, 2009

look alikes ... 23/365

look alikes ...
/lʊk-əˈlaɪks/ n.
one that closely resembles another; a double.

... could someone out there please explain this to me?? ... my first attempt at using my tripod ... aka blurriness ... trying to capture the moon ... but, why are there two? ... yes ... i know the picture sucks ... but inquiring minds wanna know! ... by the way ... no one ever said the pictures have to be good ...

10 comments:

Rachel said...

I can't explain it, but I love the duplication. I think it's a great picture, very artistic.

Danudin said...

It has to be something to do with the Moon - I think they call it LUNACY - My attempt at a moon with green foliage in the foreground gave me a moon on a green cheese background, I don't know why and Julie PMed me twice to try and uncover the reason, and still don't know. I will come back to this post to see what the Boffins say. Oh by the way I love the eerie nature of the shot and the mirage effect makes it perfectly unsettling - it is a keeper.

Chesney said...

don't have a clue, but what you don't like, we love! Very "haunted" and "mystic" looking! Even though you didn't do it on purpose, this is really kinda cool!!

Lorri said...

Beats me as to why it happened...but the result is good and creepy mystical. I like it. You've got a great starter image there for something wonderfully Halloweenish later this year!

ellens365 said...

I have no idea either but really like it

BobbieCoughlin said...

I don't think it sucks at all. To me, it's eerie and atmospheric. It looks like a shot taken from a planet in another solar system.

MevetS said...

The reason for the two moons are reflections in the optical path. Did you have a filter on the lens? Each time the light hits a glass surface some is reflected back. That reflected light can be reflected again. Of course most of the light passes through to the sensor. But in circumstances like this, a bright object in an otherwise dark scene, the reflections can become visible.

If you did have a filter then the light went through the filter, hit the front surface of the lens and was reflected back, hit the back surface of the filter and was reflected again, creating the second image. If you didn't have a filter then the reflections occurred amongst the elements of your lens.

The the image is blurry because it is over exposed. Although we often photograph the moon at night, it is in bright sunlight. Since it is night time our first tendency is to set our camera for too long an exposure. Add to that the fact that the moon is moving. It isn't obvious when high in the sky, but it is fast enough to blur fine detail.

If you can then spot meter directly on the moon. If that's not possible, set your camera on manual and experiment with exposure times until the moon is sharp. And don' forget to remove the filter. :-)

Here is an example of a moon image taken at 1/30 sec:

http://recycledphotons.blogspot.com/2009/01/in-with-old-week-five-moon-and-saturn.html

Good luck and have fun.

Madelaine said...

I don't have an answer but the photo is gorgeous!

DART said...

Neat photo...love how you framed it too!

365photosin2009 said...

Glad Steve came in with an answer. I like the image all the same. Very eerie!